Articles Posted in Medical

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Indianapolis, Indiana – The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit has upheld the district court’s decision and ruled in favor of Eli Lilly regarding validity and infringement of the vitamin regimen patent for Alimta® (pemetrexed for injection).

In the case of Eli Lilly and Company v. Teva Parenteral Medicines, Inc., et al., the court affirmed the earlier district court’s rulings that the vitamin regimen patent is valid and would be infringed by the generic challengers’ proposed products. If the patent is ultimately upheld through all remaining challenges, Alimta would maintain U.S. exclusivity until May 2022, preventing marketing of generic products for as long as the patent remains in force. The Alimta compound patent remains in force through January 24, 2017.

In March 2014, the U.S. Court for the Southern District of Indiana upheld the validity of the vitamin regimen patent. In August 2015, the same court ruled in Lilly’s favor regarding infringement of the vitamin regimen patent.

Indianapolis, Indiana – Eli Lilly and Company of Indianapolis, Indiana filed a lawsuit in the Southern District of Indiana alleging patent infringement.

Defendant is Hospira, Inc. of Lake Forest, Illinois.  It has been accused of infringing U.S. Patent No. 7,772,209 (the “‘209 patent”) by the filing of a New Drug Application (“NDA”) with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) seeking approval to manufacture and sell a pharmaceutical product, “Pemetrexed for Injection,” in various concentrations.  In its filing with the FDA, Hospira contended that the claims of Lilly’s patent are “invalid, unenforceable, and/or not infringed by the manufacture, use, offer for sale, or sale of Hospira’s NDA Products.”

Lilly contends that this product will compete with Alimta®, which also consists of the pharmaceutical chemical pemetrexed disodium.  Alimta is used as a chemotherapy agent to treat certain types of cancer.

Indianapolis, IndianaAlcon Research, Ltd. of Fort Worth, Texas and Alcon Pharmaceuticals Ltd. of Fribourg, Switzerland filed an intellectual property lawsuit in the Southern District of Indiana.  They assert infringement of two patents covering Pataday®, an ophthalmic pharmaceutical.  Pataday is covered by U.S. Patent Nos. 6,995,186 (the “‘186 patent”) and 7,402,609 (the “‘609 patent”).

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Defendant Akorn, Inc., a generic drugmaker based in Lake Forest, Illinois, filed an Abbreviated New Drug Application (“ANDA”) with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration seeking approval to manufacture and sell a generic version of Plaintiffs’ drug prior to the expiration of the two patents-in-suit.  Plaintiffs contend that the submission of this ANDA is an act of patent infringement.

In this Indiana complaint, patent lawyers for Alcon ask the court to adjudicate the following:

Indianapolis, Indiana – Patent attorneys for Plaintiff Eli Lilly and Company filed a lawsuit in the Southern District of Indiana alleging infringement.  Defendant is Fresenius Kabi USA, LLC of Lake Zurich, Illinois.

Lilly, an Indianapolis-based company, is a developer and seller of pharmaceutical drugs.  One of its drugs, ALIMTA®, is marketed as a chemotherapy agent used for the treatment of various types of cancer.

Fresenius, formerly known as APP Pharmaceuticals, LLC, manufactures and sells generic drugs.  Earlier this year, Fresenius amended its Abbreviated New Drug Application (“ANDA”), which was previously filed to seek U.S. Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) approval to manufacture three different concentrations of ALIMTA.  Through its recent amendment, Fresenius now asks for approval to manufacture and sell a fourth generic version of ALIMTA.  Lilly filed this litigation in response.

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Indianapolis, Indiana – Patent lawyers for Plaintiffs Eli Lilly and Company of Indianapolis, Indiana, its subsidiary Eli Lilly Export S.A. of Geneva, Switzerland and Acrux DDS Pty Ltd of West Melbourne, Australia filed a lawsuit alleging patent infringement. This federal lawsuit, commenced in the Southern District of Indiana, lists two Defendants, Cipla Limited of Mumbai, India and its wholly owned subsidiary Cipla USA, Inc. of Miami, Florida.

The parties in this litigation are engaged in the development and sale of pharmaceuticals. At issue is Plaintiffs’ transdermal testosterone solution, which is marketed under the trade name “Axiron®.” Lilly holds New Drug Application No. 022504 for this drug, which was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”).

Defendants submitted an Abbreviated New Drug Application (“ANDA”) to the FDA seeking approval to market a generic version of Lilly’s Axiron product. In this ANDA, Defendants certified to the FDA that they believed that the patents-in-suit were invalid, unenforceable and/or would not be infringed by the commercial manufacture, use or sale of the generic version of Axiron described in the ANDA.

According to Plaintiffs, the filing of this ANDA by Defendants constitutes patent infringement. Plaintiffs also contend that other threatened activities, such as commercial manufacture, importation and sale of a generic version of Axiron, would also infringe Plaintiffs’ patents.

Plaintiffs list three disputed patents in this lawsuit: U.S. Patent Nos. 8,435,944; 8,993,520 and 9,180,194. These patents have been issued by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Indiana attorneys for Plaintiffs ask the court for relief with respect to the following claims of patent infringement:

• Count I: Direct Infringement of U.S. Patent No. 8,435,944
• Count II: Inducement To Infringe U.S. Patent No. 8,435,944
• Count III: Contributory Infringement of U.S. Patent No. 8,435,944
• Count IV: Direct Infringement of U.S. Patent No. 8,993,520
• Count V: Inducement To Infringe U.S. Patent No. 8,993,520
• Count VI: Contributory Infringement of U.S. Patent No. 8,993,520
• Count IV [sic]: Direct Infringement of U.S. Patent No. 9,180,194
• Count V [sic]: Inducement To Infringe U.S. Patent No. 9,180,194

• Count VI [sic]: Contributory Infringement of U.S. Patent No. 9,180,194

The complaint also lists three counts seeking declaratory judgment.

Plaintiffs aver that this case is “exceptional” and ask the court for an award of their costs, including attorneys’ fees, pursuant to 35 U.S.C. §§ 285 and 271(e)(4).

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Indianapolis, Indiana – Trademark attorneys for Eli Lilly and Company of Indianapolis, Indiana and Novartis Tiergesundheit AG of Basel, Switzerland filed a lawsuit in the Southern District of Indiana alleging trademark infringement and unfair competition.

Plaintiffs offer pet medications, such as flea-control and heartworm treatments, for sale in the U.S. and other countries worldwide. Among these medications are the following trademarked products, which have been registered by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office:

ELANCO, registration number 710,473
COMFORTIS, registration number 3,370,168
INTERCEPTOR, registration number 2,015,850
CAPSTAR, registration number 2,510,863

TRIFEXIS, registration number 3,944,743

Plaintiffs allege that Defendants Scott Martin d/b/a Best Value Pet Supplies of Queensland, Australia and various unknown “Doe” Defendants infringed the trademarks at issue by selling in the U.S. trademarked products that were intended for sale in other countries via their website, www.bestvaluepetsupplies.com.

Plaintiffs contend that these products are materially different from products intended for sale in the U.S., citing differences such as different units of measure as well as non-U.S. addresses and telephone numbers listed on packaging as contact information.

In this Indiana trademark lawsuit, the following counts are alleged:

• Count I: Trademark Infringement in Violation of Section 32 of the Lanham Act
• Count II: Unfair Competition in Violation of Section 43(a) of the Lanham Act
• Count III: Unfair Competition in Violation of Indiana Common Law

Plaintiffs contend that Defendants’ conduct was willful and ask the court to order equitable relief, as well as the payment of compensatory and punitive damages, attorneys’ fees and costs of this litigation.

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Indianapolis, Indiana – Patent lawyers for Plaintiffs Eli Lilly and Company of Indianapolis, Indiana, Eli Lilly Export S.A. of Geneva, Switzerland and Acrux DDS Pty Ltd. of West Melbourne, Australia initiated patent infringement litigation in the Southern District of Indiana.

Defendants are Apotex Corp. of Weston, Florida and Apotex Inc. of Ontario, Canada. Both companies manufacture, market and distribute generic pharmaceutical products. This lawsuit was initiated in response to an Abbreviated New Drug Application submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for approval to market a generic version of Lilly’s Axiron®, a prescription testosterone product used to treat males for conditions associated with a deficiency or absence of endogenous testosterone.

Defendants are accused of infringing Plaintiffs’ intellectual property rights in seven patents: U.S. Patent Nos. 8,419,307; 8,177,449; 8,435,944; 8,807,861; 8,993,520; 9,180,194 and 9,289,586.

In a 28-count complaint, filed by Indiana patent attorneys for Plaintiffs, 21 counts of patent infringement are listed, including a count of direct infringement, a count of inducement to infringe and a count of contributory infringement for each of the seven patents-in-suit. The remaining seven counts seek declaratory judgment of infringement of each of the seven patents.

In addition to relief for the wrongdoings alleged in the 28 counts, Plaintiffs seek reimbursement of the costs and attorneys’ fees associated with this lawsuit.

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Hammond, Indiana – Trademark attorneys for Plaintiff Indiana Botanic Gardens, Inc. of Hobart, Indiana sued Defendant Snyder Manufacturing Corporation of Long Beach, California, which does business as Eurospa Aromatics and Eurospa Chemicals, alleging trademark infringement and related causes of action.

At issue in the lawsuit is U.S. Trademark Registration No. 1,327,965 for the trademark EUCAMINT for camphorated ointment. Plaintiff states that it owns this registration, which was issued April 2, 1985. It also states that the mark was first used in commerce in 1925. Plaintiff contends that Defendant’s use of EUCAMINT to market an aromatic shower mist infringes its trademark.

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This litigation, filed by Indiana trademark lawyers for Plaintiff, asserts the following causes of action:

• Count I: Federal Trademark Infringement
• Count II: Unfair Competition Under Federal Law

• Count III: Common Law Trademark Infringement and Unfair Competition Under Indiana Law

Plaintiff Indiana Botanic Gardens claims that Defendant Snyder Manufacturing acted intentionally and willfully in an attempt to trade upon the goodwill of the EUCAMINT trademark. Plaintiff asks that the court order the payment of damages, including punitive damages. It also seeks equitable relief, costs and attorneys’ fees.

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Indianapolis, Indiana – Patent attorneys for Plaintiff Stone Basket Innovations LLC (“SBI”) of Austin, Texas filed a lawsuit in the Eastern District of Texas asserting patent infringement. The case was transferred to the Southern District of Indiana.

Plaintiff SBI alleges that Defendant Cook Medical LLC (“Cook”) of Bloomington, Indiana infringed U.S. Patent No. 6,551,327 (the “‘327 patent”) entitled “Endoscopic Stone Extraction Device with Improved Basket.” This litigation lists that assertion, “infringement of U.S. Patent No. 6,551,327,” as its sole count.

SBI seeks a judgment that Cook has infringed one or more of the claims of the ‘327 patent literally and/or under the doctrine of equivalents. Further, SBI asks the court to determine that Cook’s infringement was willful and that the case is exceptional.

Plaintiff asks the court for injunctive relief and compensatory damages. It also seeks an award of enhanced damages under 35 U.S.C. § 284 and attorney fees and costs under 35 U.S.C. § 285.

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Indianapolis, Indiana – An Indiana patent lawyer for Plaintiff Eli Lilly and Company of Indianapolis, Indiana (“Lilly”) filed a patent infringement lawsuit in the Southern District of Indiana. The allegations of infringement have been directed at Defendants Teva Pharmaceuticals USA, Inc. of North Wales, Pennsylvania and its parent company Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. of Israel.

This lawsuit was instituted in response to Abbreviated New Drug Application (“ANDA”) No. 208569, which was filed with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration by Teva USA. The ANDA seeks approval to market a generic version of Forteo®, a prescription drug offered by Lilly to treat osteoporosis.

At issue in this litigation are Lilly’s U.S. Patent Nos. 6,770,623; 7,144,861; 7,550,434; 6,977,077; 7,163,684; and 7,351,414. All have been issued by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Lilly contends that the filing of the ANDA constitutes direct infringement, inducement to infringe and contributory infringement of these patents under U.S. patent law.

Lilly seeks equitable relief, costs and attorney’s fees.

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